Posts tagged ‘Interoperability’

Marshaling Unions

If this is your first time you hear about unions or you need to know more about them, please refer to our article “A short speech about Unions” first.

You can marshal a union the same way you marshal structures. However, because of the way that unions laid-out into memory, you will need to explicitly set variable positions inside the type.

Microsoft Win32 to Microsoft .NET Framework API Map

This MSDN article identifies the .NET Framework APIs that provide similar functionality to those of Microsoft Win32 API.

Moving a Form without the Title Bar

Today, we are talking about how to move a form without its title bar.

You might have noticed that some applications with fancy UIs do not allow the user to move the window from its title bar. Honestly, some hide the overall title bar from the user. An example of these applications is Microsoft Windows Media Player -when in skin mode,- and Microsoft Windows Live Messenger. Both applications allow you to drag their windows using the client area not the title bar.

In this lesson, you will learn how to do this trick to move the form without its title bar.

Changing Display Settings Programmatically

Previously, we have talked about how to change screen resolution and color system via DirectX. Today, we are talking about how to change all display settings -not the resolution and color system only- via API. We will change screen resolution (bounds,) color system (bit count,) rotation (orientation,) and refresh rate (frequency) via API with C# and the .NET Framework.

Changing Screen Resolution Programmatically via DirectX

This lesson focuses on how to change the screen resolution and color system programmatically via DirectX. It starts by an overview about how the Windows satisfies user’s need through the Display Settings window. Then, it digs into discussing how to retrieve these settings and to change these programmatically in the .NET environment.

Programmatically Turning on the Screen Saver

This lesson focuses on how to programmatically turn on the screen saver.

Programming Microsoft Agent in Windows Forms

Microsoft Agent is an unprecedented technology to create innovative, new conversational interfaces for applications and Web pages. It provides powerful animation capability, interactivity, and versatility, with incredible ease of development.

Microsoft Agent is a technology that provides a foundation for more natural ways for people to communicate with their computers. It is a set of software services that enable developers to incorporate interactive animated characters into their applications and Web pages. These characters can speak, via a Text-to-Speech (TTS) engine or recorded audio, and even accept spoken voice commands. Microsoft Agent empowers developers to extend the user interface beyond the conventional mouse and keyboard interactions prevalent today.

Windows 7 .NET Interop Sample Libraries

We’ve got .NET sample libraries and example for managed code developers to target Windows 7 new APIs!